Success in every area of life depends on the power of one’s magnetism to attract it. Broadly defined, magnetism is the power of attraction. Ordinary metal magnets attract other metal objects according to the power of the magnets. The stronger the magnet, the stronger the magnetism. Magnetism is not only a property of certain metals, however.  Applied to people, magnetism is an inner force which attracts people, things, and opportunities that are on the same “wavelength.”

A basic principle of magnetism is that “like attracts like.” We become like the people with whom we mingle, not through their conversation, but through the magnetic vibrations emanating from their bodies. The person whose magnetism is stronger gives his vibrations to the other.

There are as many different types of magnetism as there are people. Musicians have one kind of magnetism, financiers another, and scientists still another. We must first decide what kind of magnetism we want and then associate with those people who possess it. If we want to become artists, we should associate with talented artists. If we want to become good at business, we should associate with successful business people or leaders. If we want to become strong spiritually, we should associate with devotees of God.

Paramhansa Yogananda—the great spiritual teacher and author of the classic Autobiography of a Yogi—described spiritual magnetism as the “power of all powers,” and often counseled people, even those seeking material success, to concentrate first on developing spiritual magnetism. He said: “Develop power to attract the highest thing, then you can easily attract all lesser things.” When we have strong spiritual magnetism, we are able to attract whatever else we need: inspiration, money, the right job, a good living situation, or a compatible life partner.

Naidhruva Rush

Naidhruva Rush graduated from Harvard Law School in 1964, and then worked in the Civil Rights Movement as a staff attorney for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. She later served as Director of Community Law Offices in New York City.

While working as a law professor in the mid-1970s, Naidhruva read Paramhansa Yogananda’s classic Autobiography of a Yogi, and a year later, moved to Ananda Village with her eight-year-old son. Since then, Naidhruva has served as a minister and teacher at Ananda, offering courses on meditation and spiritual living. She also served as editor of The Essence of Clarity (formerly Clarity Magazine), and edited the books In Divine Friendship and Swami Kriyananda: A Life in God. Naidhruva is the author of The Ananda Cookbook and Change Your Magnetism, Change Your Life.

Introduction
1. Will Power and Energy
2. Concentration
3. Enthusiasm
4. Kindness
5. Positive Attitudes
6. Honesty and Truthfulness
7. Integrity
8. Solution Consciousness
9. Non-Attachment
10. The Law of Karma
11. Attunement with the Infinite Consciousness
Conclusion
About the Author
Further Explorations

Introduction

Success in every area of life depends on the power of one’s magnetism to attract it. Broadly defined, magnetism is the power of attraction. Ordinary bar magnets attract metal objects according to the power of the magnets. The stronger the magnet, the stronger the magnetism. Magnetism is not only a property of certain metals, however. Applied to people, magnetism is an inner force which attracts people, things, and opportunities that are on the same “wavelength.”

A basic principle of magnetism is “like attracts like.” We become like the people with whom we mingle, not through their conversation, but through the magnetic vibrations emanating from their bodies and their beings. The person whose magnetism is stronger gives his vibrations to the other.

There are as many different types of magnetism as there are people. Musicians have one kind of magnetism, financiers another, and scientists still another. We must first decide what kind of magnetism we want and then associate with those people who possess it. If we want to become artists, we should associate with talented artists. If we want to become good at business, we should associate with successful business people or leaders. If we want to become strong spiritually, we should associate with devotees of God.

Paramhansa Yogananda—the great spiritual teacher and author of the classic Autobiography of a Yogi—described spiritual magnetism as the “power of all powers,” and often counseled people, even those seeking material success, to concentrate first on developing spiritual magnetism. He said: “Develop power to attract the highest thing, then you can easily attract all lesser things.” When we have strong spiritual magnetism, we are able to attract whatever else we need: inspiration, money, the right job, a good living situation, or a compatible life partner.

The strength and quality of your magnetism

In the following pages you will find a discussion of magnetism tailored to the needs of people actively seeking a better way to live in today’s tumultuous times.

For the sake of clarity, the different aspects of magnetism are often presented as individual and separate, though in actuality they blend together in an inseparable whole. Some aspects of magnetism are foundational. Much like the foundation of a house, they form the supporting structure. To eliminate any one of them is to weaken or collapse the entire structure. Will power, energy, concentration, and enthusiasm fall into this category. These four aspects determine the overall strength of your magnetism.

The nine other aspects of magnetism discussed in these pages, starting with the chapter on kindness, determine the quality of your magnetism and are what distinguish the sinner from the saint, the mafia capo from a Padre Pio, the corporate defrauder from a Mother Teresa. These nine interrelated aspects might be compared to the brightly colored pieces of glass in a kaleidoscope which, when shaken, form interesting and sometimes beautiful patterns. If you are seeking a more fulfilling life, the challenge is to make choices that will cause the kaleidoscope of your magnetism to resolve into vibrant, divinely attuned patterns.

It is my sincere wish that the following discussion of the thirteen aspects of magnetism will enable you to select choices that lead to true happiness.

Sample Chapter
(excerpt)

Chapter One

Will Power and Energy

Strong will power is a prerequisite for strong magnetism and for every kind of success. History is full of instructive examples of the life-changing power of will. An especially inspiring example is that of Helen Keller, who was deprived of sight and hearing following a mysterious illness when she was nineteen months old.

Helen Keller: Will power equal to every challenge

Helen Keller was six years old in 1887 when Anne Sullivan, a teacher trained in teaching the blind, entered her life. By then her parents were desperate. Helen was given to tantrums and violent outbursts and had become completely unmanageable.

After winning Helen’s confidence, Anne began the process of teaching her. Anne introduced Helen to the world of language and communication by using finger movements to spell words in Helen’s hand. An eager and inquisitive student, Helen learned thirty words the very first day. Thereafter, it was Helen who usually led her teacher by the hand as she moved from object to object in her environment, determined to learn the names of familiar objects. From then on, Anne Sullivan was Helen’s constant companion.

Throughout Helen’s long life, her will power proved equal to whatever challenges she embraced, including obtaining a college education. In 1890, after attending schools for the blind and deaf, Helen gained admittance to Radcliffe College in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She was eighteen years old.

Despite Helen’s enthusiasm and determination to work hard, she found the educational process unusually laborious. Anne had to spell all lectures into Helen’s hand. Books had to be translated into Braille. Tests were especially difficult: Anne could not be present and directions were sometimes unclear. Nonetheless, in 1904, Helen became the first blind-deaf person to graduate from college, earning her Radcliffe degree cum laude. Before graduation, with the help of a Harvard student, Helen wrote her first book, The Story of My Life. Thirteen more books would follow. She also became proficient in Latin, Greek, German, and French.

Determined to communicate with others as conventionally as possible, Helen learned to speak and spent much of her life giving lectures. In 1918, at age thirty-one, she began her lifelong work of improving the quality of life for people who were blind or, as she was, both blind and deaf. A tireless advocate, Helen traveled to thirty-nine countries and, through her speeches and personal example, sparked a movement that resulted in the introduction of numerous programs to educate and train the blind and the deaf-blind.

Helen Keller’s strong will power was the decisive factor in her being able to attract success in ways considered impossible for a person with her physical handicaps. Other aspects of magnetism were also at work, including enthusiasm and a positive attitude, qualities which we will discuss in later chapters. For Helen, however, will power that translated into perseverance and persistence was clearly the crucial element. In Helen Keller’s long life, no obstacle proved too great, no challenge too difficult for her indomitable will power.

Strong will power creates a magnetic field that can attract to us whatever we are seeking. What Helen Keller attracted included a college education; opportunities to improve the lives of people who were deaf or blind and deaf; a circle of devoted friends and supporters that included Alexander Graham Bell, Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain), and Oliver Wendell Holmes—and a deeply fulfilling life.